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Contact Ken Rubin
Foundation
More About Using My Access
to Information Services

  1. Contact me by e mail or phone to discuss what information you want.

  2. Let me know what your expectations are, and provide me with relevant information.

  3. Discuss costs. I try and keep both my costs and government charges down.

  4. Access requests rarely take a month to complete. Nowadays, unfortunately, they can take a few or more months to complete – I try to get data or partial data as soon as possible.

  5. On average, I find it takes at least 3 to 8 hours of my time per application to get access records. Filing complaints or appeals involves additional time.

  6. It can be that more than one access request is needed, involving up to several agencies and more than one jurisdiction.

  7. Communications are kept confidential. In most access cases (but not for personal information) data, once released, can be accessed by others.

  8. Agreement on the framing of applications or on modifications to applications is important. That's why drafts of requests are shared with you for review. As well, I would share the progress I am having in getting the data for you.

  9. At times, I am also asked to evaluate access applications already submitted, bogged down, or completed.

  10. At times, too, you or your group may find it advantageous to have a workshop on the various aspects of trying to get data through access to information.



Next: What the Access Process Involves






“I had the good fortune beginning in 2001 to link up with Ken Rubin who was making access applications to ferret out the details of the Canadian government multi-million dollar funding of the Asbestos Institute (now the Chysolite Institute). Those often delayed documents even though heavily censored presented an explosive picture of industry dirty dealings, government connivance, and manipulation by Canadian vested interests of international bodies and other countries' struggles to cope with Canadian asbestos exports and propaganda. To this day, those documents continue to provide our international group with a rich source of materials.”

Laurie Kazan-Allen
Coordinator: International Ban Asbestos Secretariat
April 28, 2010





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